Where to Buy Shiitake Logs at the Best Price

The mushrooms grow on logs and these logs can be prepared by you. The Shiitake mushroom is easy to grow by anyone as it does not need soil of different layers and nutrition. They grow on logs. You may plan to grow a huge quantity of Shiitake fruits and for this – it is better to buy the logs. You will need logs with 4″ diameter and the log should have its bark intact. The woods that are preferred are oak, poplar, alder and maple variety. The hardwoods are to be avoided. The conifers like fir or cedar are also of no use for you. When you have a 4 feet long log, it will be better to handle and you can put 10 to 12 plugs in it.

Online stores

There are different online sites where you can buy these Shiitake Logs to grow your fruits on them. You will have to find out the way these logs are used for using them for growing the fruits. These fruits are grown widely and are second to the most common button mushrooms. You can use the Shiitake Mushroom Logs for these fruits so that you can raise certified and organic sprouts. These can be used to create a commercial operation if you have some space for the hardwood logs and shady place to keep these logs for a good production. You just need to get a reference from any friends who grow these mushrooms and go to the site to buy the logs for sale.

Stores with guidance and instructions

These stores will have logs containing a substrate that are inoculated with spawn for proper growth. These stores often will have mycelium for colonizing the substrate. The mycelium will be kept in some bags and used until the substrate is completely colonized. The store will ship you the Mushroom logs for sale so that you can harvest your crop within 10 – 12 days. You can grow the fresh fruits and sell to the proper outlets. Often the online stores will give you instructions to grow the fruits and save time for your crop harvest. The logs are of high yield and stable quality. They will also have a high conversion rate.

Farms with mushroom logs

There are farms that will have Oaks, hornbeams, sweet gum and ironwood for mushroom cultivating base. These farms will sell you the hardwood tree logs and you can start cultivating the fruits on them. The trees are cut after the leaves have turned brown and sap migrate downwards to work as antifreeze. These farms often take the logs from firewood suppliers or farmers too. They stack the logs in their storehouse in the proper shade. Loosely kept logs are handled with care and are mostly kept covered with cloth.

Prepare a Shiitake log

You can start preparing a log for growing the mushrooms on them. These logs must be hardwood and they are to be inserted with plugs. These plugs will have the mycelium growing there. The logs are bored with holes so that the mycelium starts colonizing. They will soon grow into Shiitake sprouts for you to take off and sell. You need to drill in the logs for the plugs and then rubber mallet the plugs. Use beeswax for sealing the plugs. Store the log in a shady place until it is ready for cultivation.

Marketing Prints

In the past lithography and traditional printing methods were used if the artist wanted to market reproductions of original artwork. While effective, these methods had serious drawbacks:

First and foremost, a high output number would compromise the value of any reproduction. Second, the quality of 4 color copies limited the color rendition of such reproductions. Also, the choice of substrates was dismal compared to giclée. The advent of high-end digital printmaking has opened a new world for artists: more paper choices, better color, limited production.

On a pure marketing standpoint, artists who have shows and lectures can now suggest giclees to potential buyers. Collectors in particular want to buy art that is not made in mass quantities. When buying a giclée they are assured to possess something rare and exquisite.

Giclees are well established in the art world; they are bought and sold in world class auctions as well as in galleries. Many museums display giclees.

Listen to your clients: I recently had a call from a portrait artist. She has a business where customers come to her for family portraits she makes on watercolor paper. She had a few inquiries regarding making copies so that more than one household could have the portrait of their loved ones. At the same time they asked for a quality print, possibly on the same paper. We reproduced the original and it was virtually impossible to distinguish it from the giclée. Now the artist was happy to make additional income and the families had as many portraits as they wanted!

No matter what the market is, whether it consists of commissioned art or not, high quality reproductions can generate an additional stream of income given the proper marketing.

How can you increase the value of your artwork?

One proven method is to create posters (It has been done for a long time by artists and photographers) and sell the posters at art shows. This creates a buzz and facilitates the selling of your work in a poster format to be displayed in various locations. A well designed poster is one of the best advertisements!

Second, create art and make high quality giclée reproductions without ever selling your originals. Make for example an artist proof edition of 25, sign it and release it as the only art available.

If you wish to be able to sell your original you can do so and still increase the value of your art. Start with small limited editions. As soon they are sold out the value will increase. Always establish and maintain a personal relationship with every past, current and potential buyer of your art! Buyers connect emotionally with the art as well as the creator. They will be more receptive to collecting more work if they feel a bond.

Use the Internet

Create a website with a portfolio so people can see the art. Add the URL to business cards, posters, postcards etc. Optimize the site for keywords you want to target (i.e. abstract paintings, oil paintings of flowers, portraits on oil etc.)

The artist is encouraged to pre-sell the complete limited edition if a LE is decided. It is a good idea to track the collectors and notify them when the particular edition is sold out. Another advantage of having a website is to create a newsletter notifying people of limited edition publication as well as accomplishments and new art. These practices reinforce the added value of their current (or potential) purchase. Last but not least, ask for a Certificate of Authenticity from the printmaker.

Pop Music Producer Roadblocks to Success

Wannabe producers always have at least one fatal flaw. Now the flaw varies from person to person, but they basically fall under 3 categories. So to lets list out the rules to keep you in the game.

People Skills

Lets start with the granddaddy. This is a people biz hombre. You deal with people all the time, whether it be label execs, engineers, or the talent you are producing.

Because of this critical point your people skills will make or break your career. This may seem overrated if you come from the school of thought that says, “if I get a single it will be enough.” Honestly, maybe. But your success is so much more likely if you treat people in a way that makes them feel good.

That is what brings Rick Ruben success in this industry. That man is unquestionably the biggest thing on the scene. He has hits in all genres from Rap, to Country and people want to work with the cat because he makes them feel good, and alive.

Do you do this?

If not maybe its time to learn. Go get a copy of How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie. It could be a career changing book

Overshadowing

The second mistake that many produces make is to cast a looming shadow over an entire project. This is usually because the producer is a control freak. This type of producer has their fingerprints all over an album, and the artist feels suffocated by their presence.

Music is supposed to be an outflow of a vision. A song comes to life out of an artist, if they feel stifled by an overbearing oppressive regime you are not going to get the best production out of them. That is the truth.

Now, that does not mean that a good producer cannot point out flaws and errors, it just means that it should be done in a way that makes the talent want to change, not hole up and die.

Work on allowing the artist to breathe. Give them space to be an artist, but yet keep the project moving forward. Its tough, but hey that’s your job.

Limited Chops

The last area that hang up wannabe producers is a limited pallet of chops. This shows up in the inability to get the sounds, beats, or vocal takes because of lack of knowledge. A know-it-all attitude is a sure way to shoot yourself in the foot.

Broadway In Chicago’s The Pirate Queen

There is a new production by Broadway in Chicago called “The Pirate Queen”. This musical is a must see for everyone. The book is by Alain Doublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg. The music is by Claude-Michel Schonberg and the lyrics are by Alain Boublil & John Dempsey.

Nothing was spared in producing the lavish new production. Everything about the play was excellent: Music, lighting, choreography, staging, sound, costumes, sets, and story line.

The entire production was a success and the audience expressed their satisfaction with standing ovations. Not only was the production excellent but the acting was superior at all levels. The actors really make you feel as though you were part of the action.

Briefly the story is set in Elizabethan England where friction is set between the Irish and the English. Captain Dubhdara is the head of a clan that is set upon keeping the English off of their land. A pirate that has a daughter, Grania, who he dearly loves and who eventually becomes in charge of the fleet of pirates to defend Ireland from England. The story goes on with Grania’s personal affairs leading to a final meeting with Queen Elizabeth I.

The action is ever present and the dancing outstanding. In particular the bar scene in the First Act was very lively and the dancing was outstanding. At times the audience felt like they wanted to go on stage and join in the dance. It was all very moving and exciting. It was a pleasure to be there.

Keeping Costumes Clean and Beautiful

Costumes are a big investment whether they are store-bought, custom-made or handmade by you. Keeping your costume looking and smelling wonderful will enhance your confidence and stage presence. In particular, costumes embellished with beads or other decorations need to be handled with care to preserve their beauty. Precautions to prevent damage and prompt stain removal will give your costumes a long and beautiful life.

Preventing damage

Perspiration is acidic and will damage and stain fabrics. Using dress shields or promptly removing stains prevents acidic damage. It helps to use deodorants or anti-antiperspirants that dry clear; some products leave white residue that transfers unsightly debris to fabrics.

Perfume and many hairsprays contain alcohol, which damages sequins and fades the color of some fabrics. A towel or other cover over your costume will prevent damage from spills when dressing for a show.

Keeping costumes fresh and clean

One of the best ways to keep your costumes clean is to ensure that your body is clean when you get ready to wear it. If you sweat during the day and then put on your costume, you immediately transfer dirt and odor onto the costume. You can prevent this by taking a shower or using wipes on your body just before putting on your costume. Use hypoallergenic wipes for sensitive skin.

Some costumes are more sweat-proof than others. A thin cotton t-shirt or crop top worn under opaque, loose-fitting costumes will absorb perspiration, keeping acidic moisture away from the costume. Some long-sleeved folkloric costumes have cutouts in the armpit area, which prevents perspiration stains and odor on fabrics while allowing more freedom of movement for the arms. Dress shields are also a useful alternative for preventing fabric damage in the underarm area.

Washing and dry cleaning

Silks and some cotton fabrics are prone to fading when washed or dry-cleaned, losing their color vibrancy. If cleaning is necessary, test a fabric swatch or inconspicuous area of the garment. Dry cleaning is less dangerous to some fabrics than washing; however, dry cleaning results in loss of glued-on decorations, applies heat and fades silk.

If washing a costume in the washing machine is unavoidable, you can put it inside a pillowcase and tie the opening in a knot, using the delicate cycle and cold water to avoid damaging sewn-on beads, coins and other embellishments. A stain remover stick is helpful for removing stains. Be sure all the stain is gone before putting the item in the dryer, since heat will set some stains, making them harder to remove later. Delicate fabrics can be laid out to air dry, which is safer for them than using a dryer.

Storage

If your costume is not washable or dry-cleanable (as is the case of many beaded costumes) let the costume air dry after a performance in order to allow perspiration to completely evaporate. This is also very important for shoes and wigs.

Some performers lightly spray costume linings with a vodka and water mixture to minimize odors. If you do this, test an inconspicuous area or fabric swatch first to determine whether it is safe for your fabric. Always avoid spraying alcohol-based products on embellishments such as sequins, beads and plastic decorations. Alcohol fades some fabrics, so use with caution.

Costumes should never be stored until completely dry, because wet storage will result in mold, which could completely ruin the costume. Be especially careful not to store wet shoes in plastic. Store your costume away from direct sunlight and bright lights to avoid fading; this is vital for preserving delicate silks and antique fabrics.

Costumes with heavy beadwork, or made of net or stretchy fabrics should not be stored on hangers, since they may be permanently stretched. These costumes can be stored flat or rolled. Fasten hooks and eyes and close zippers when storing. In addition, avoid wood and plastic hangers, since they release acids, which cause fabric stains with long-term storage. Padded hangers are a safer choice.

Taking care of your costumes will ensure that they look and smell lovely for many performances.